Ben Tameifuna suspended for 5 weeks for pushing referee Glen Jackson

first_imgThursday Sep 4, 2014 Ben Tameifuna suspended for 5 weeks for pushing referee Glen Jackson Following a citing and three hour disciplinary hearing in Auckland, Waikato prop Ben Tameifuna has been banned for five weeks for pushing referee Glen Jackson. Present were Chiefs coach Dave Rennie, the Waikato coaching and management team, referee Jackson and Tameifuna himself.In weighing up the evidence, Judicial Officer Chris Morris noted that Tameifuna had apologised to Jackson immediately after the game and this was accepted. Mr Morris acknowledged the player was genuinely remorseful and had accepted his actions were inexcusable. Morris also accepted the player’s statement that he was focussed on defending the goal line and that moving the referee away from that line was an instinctive move that was motivated by playing the game, rather than by malicious intent.He also took into account that Jackson had not taken issue with the incident and he did not believe the push to be maliciously intended.“Having taking into account the evidence, the player’s post-match apology to the referee, his full acknowledgement that his actions were inappropriate, I have endeavoured to impose a proportionate sanction taking into account other similar situations from overseas decisions.“However it is imperative that players instinctively know that it is never, under any circumstances, appropriate for a player to abuse, verbally or physically, a match official,” Morris said.“Taking all those factors into account, I find that a suspension of 5 weeks is appropriate. He is banned immediately from all rugby up to and including 5 October.”View the full incident here, or see a short video of it from Instagram belowADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Big Hits & Dirty Play Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO Suspensions handed down after testicle grabbing… 26 WEEKS AGO The ‘double ruffle’ splits opinion with fans… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: The nastiest and most brutal moments… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyDoctors Stunned: She Removes Her Wrinkles With This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items With A Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Free advice on fundraising advertising by CAP

first_imgFree advice on fundraising advertising by CAP The organisers say that the event will be particularly relevant to charity marketing and brand managers, advertising agencies, and marketing consultants.The event will take place on 19 September from 09.00 – 10.30 at CAP’s offices on the first floor of Mid City Place, 71 High Holborn, London. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Individual giving The Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) is holding a free, morning master class to help those involved in using non-broadcast advertising for fundraising appeals or raising the profile of charities to do so without breaching the CAP Advertising Code.The Advice:am event will cover how the CAP rules apply to charity advertising, advice on interpreting those rules, and looking at how they are applied and enforced by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA).The CAP Code contains clear rules on relevantissues, including the use of shock tactics, direct marketing and promotions. Advertisementcenter_img  19 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 13 September 2007 | Newslast_img read more

Pentagon threatens Iran, supports aggression against Yemen

first_imgThe Pentagon has sent nine warships, including an aircraft carrier and a guided-missile cruiser, to waters off the coast of Yemen.April 27 — The Pentagon has engaged in a sharp escalation of military tensions in the Middle East by sending nine warships, including an aircraft carrier and a guided-missile cruiser, to waters off the coast of Yemen.The naval armada has a dual purpose: to push back the popular forces of the Ansarullah (the Houthis) and at the same time to threaten the Iranian ­government.The Ansarullah are fighting against the Saudi/U.S. puppet in exile, President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi. Hadi was driven out of the country and is now in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, waiting to be restored to power by Saudi jets and U.S. and Egyptian ships.The Pentagon has sent the warships off the coast of Yemen to support the Saudi bombing campaign against the Ansarullah. Egyptian warships also patrol the coast. The Saudis, supplied with U.S. targeting, have bombed hospitals, schools, mosques and airports on the pretext that weapons were hidden there. The naval blockade choked off ports and airports, blocking food and other vital imports to one of the poorest countries in the region.“The goal of the movement of American ships is to strengthen the siege imposed on Yemen and put the Yemeni people under collective punishment,” charged Houthi Politburo member Mohammed al-Bukhaiti. (Reuters, April 21)But despite over a month of Saudi bombing and thousands of civilian casualties, the Ansarullah still control the capital of Sanaa and most of the major port city of Aden. They have recently continued an advance on the southern city of Taiz.On April 20, the Saudis carried out an airstrike on a Scud missile base in Sanaa. The resulting explosion impacted a residential area of over half a mile. The blast damaged embassies and other buildings, wounding two Indonesian diplomats.But the U.S.-backed bombing campaign, arms embargo and sanctions on Ansarullah leaders has both failed and backfired on Washington.The Saudis are becoming more hated and thoroughly discredited for their ruthless and failed air campaign. The more discredited the Saudis become, the more discredited their Washington sponsors become. The U.S. imperialists are having second thoughts, and have allowed the U.N. Security Council to call for a cease-fire. Of course, the U.N. is demanding that the Ansarullah withdraw from territories they have taken.Pentagon crashes nuclear talksMeanwhile, the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt was moved to the Gulf of Aden off the coast of Yemen from the Persian Gulf. The carrier has over 60 war planes and a crew of 5,000. It has since returned to the Persian Gulf. In addition the U.S. sent the guided-missile ship USS Normandy to accompany the Roosevelt.The pretext for sending this massive display of air and fire power is to keep Iran from sending weapons to the Ansarullah in Yemen. Such a claim, if it weren’t so serious, would be laughable. An aircraft carrier and its associated warships, destroyers, frigates and so on are weapons of major warfare. You don’t block supply ships and their military escorts with an aircraft carrier and a guided-missile ship. It is like taking a pile driver to crack a walnut.The purpose of this display of firepower was to warn the Iranian government of Washington’s willingness to deploy its most powerful weapons of conventional warfare.The Pentagon considers itself a sovereign power, free to roam the seas with massive firepower to threaten and bully the peoples of the world who will not bow down to the dictates of Washington and Wall Street. It treats waters thousands of miles from U.S. shores as “U.S. lakes.”The Pentagon does not need 60 warplanes in the area. The Saudis have an oversupply of U.S. warplanes and bombs and are using them daily. The U.S. high command has admitted that the warships are not for Yemen but to keep their “options” open against Iran. (CNN.com, April 22)This is all about threatening the Iranian government and perhaps trying to force it into concessions in the nuclear talks, or even to break up the talks altogether.The Iranians have military vessels in the area to escort and protect their cargo ships from piracy. Iranian Navy Commander Rear Admiral Habibollah Sayyari stated, “This presence [of the Iranian flotilla] continues in the free waters, including the Gulf of Aden, to fight against piracy, according to the plan which was drawn at the request of the International Maritime Organization, and no one can warn the Iranian warships [to move away] and this has not happened yet.” Sayyari was speaking to reporters on the sidelines of military parades held in Tehran to mark Army Day. (Fars News Agency)The most important point of this entire episode, as far as the anti-imperialist movement is concerned, is that the U.S. imperialist navy has no business in the Gulf of Aden, the Persian Gulf, the Mediterranean, the South China Sea or any other body of water. The U.S. anti-war movement should demand that the Pentagon stop threatening the peoples of the world in order to make the world safe for U.S. imperialist corporations.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Ralphs Will Rollout Online Grocery Shopping in Pasadena

first_img Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Subscribe More Cool Stuff Herbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Questions To Start Conversation Way Better Than ‘How U Doing?’HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeauty Top of the News center_img The Ralphs Grocery chain has launched its version of online supermarket shopping, and said it will expand the service to include Pasadena in coming months.The Ralphs service is called ClickList. Customers order online but head to the store’s parking lot to pick up their groceries. At the store, they will be greeted by a special team, who have hand-pulled the items from the store’s shelves.Ralphs has three locations in Pasadena. This one is in Old Pasadena, at 380 West Colorado Boulevard.The team will load up each customer’s cars with his or her order.Ralphs began offering ClickList at its Carlsbad store earlier this month.“It’s important that we stay ahead of our competition,” said Ralphs President Valerie Jabbar in a company statement. “Our customers’ lifestyles are constantly changing, and we have to change with them. It’s exciting to be part of something that makes such a big difference in the lives of our customers.”To order online, a customer pulls up the Ralphs ClickList page (Ralphs.com/ClickList), orders and selects a pickup time at the store.Only credit and debit cards are accepted with the service. Cash or checks are not accepted.The ClickList service has no minimum or maximum to place an order and available products include most products found in a Ralphs store and over-the-counter health and beauty products, tobacco and liquor. Some seasonal items, hot foods and pharmacy prescriptions will not be available for online ordering, the chain said in a press release.As an introductory offer, Ralphs is waiving the $6.95 ClickList service charge for a customer’s first three orders.Ralphs operates three grocery stores in the Pasadena area. The company has not yet made clear if the ClickList service will be available at all of the locations. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Business News 7 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News First Heatwave Expected Next Week Business: Retail News Ralphs Will Rollout Online Grocery Shopping in Pasadena From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, August 17, 2016 | 6:37 pm Make a commentlast_img read more

Senator O’Domhnaill accuses Government of favouring private ‘D4’ schools

first_img Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Google+ Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Facebook Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Need for issues with Mica redress scheme to be addressed raised in Seanad also WhatsApp The Government has been accused of protecting private schools in Dublin at the expense of smaller schools across the country.During heated exchanges on education cuts in the Seanad, Donegal Senator Brian O’Domhnaill claimed 70 teachers will lose their jobs in Donegal while 87% of Protestant schools will be effected.The concerns centre on cuts which could see small schools across the country with four teachers or fewer start to close in 2012.Speaking in the Seanad, Senator O’Domhnaill accused the government of favouring the better off:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/bri3pmskool.mp3[/podcast] Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Twitter Previous articleNew NI laws allow woman missing in Donegal to be declared deadNext articleShots fired at two bookmakers’ premises in Derry News Highland center_img Senator O’Domhnaill accuses Government of favouring private ‘D4’ schools By News Highland – February 9, 2012 Pinterest Facebook Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margey Newsx Adverts Pinterest Google+ WhatsApp LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton last_img read more

Woman trapped in New York City elevator rescued after three days

first_imgJeffrey Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images(NEW YORK) — A woman was rescued Monday morning after spending three nights trapped inside a New York City elevator, according to the New York Fire Department.The woman, a cleaning employee, became stuck between the second and third floors while working in a private townhouse on Manhattan’s Upper East Side on Friday.Firefighters forced open the elevator’s doors just after 10 a.m. Monday and the woman was taken to a hospital, the FDNY said. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img

Legislative bodies agree to work together

first_img Previous Article Next Article The three European bodies responsible for introducing new legislation haveagreed to work more closely in a bid to make regulations easier for employersto work with. The European Parliament, European Commission and European Council areexpected to sign a new agreement promising to streamline the decision-makingprocess and improve the way new laws are developed and put in place Patrick Cox, president of the European Parliament, said all three bodiesneeded to improve their working relationships with each other and businesses. “By the end of the Italian presidency, we hope to have completed theagreement that will see us working closely together to improve the process ofregulation-making,” he said. He said the new approach would require more input from employers and hehoped the EU could develop a better relationship with business. “We want better regulation and better impact assessment of the laws wedo introduce. To do this, we need a better relationship with business,” headded. With European legislation representing half of all new laws affectingorganisations, the deal could give employers a key voice in future workplacerules. Cox said the deal could lead to a lighter touch when implementing newlegislation because business would have been more involved in the process. Comments are closed. Legislative bodies agree to work togetherOn 25 Nov 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Director of US Navy Nurse Corps Retired

first_img August 2, 2013 The director of the Navy Nurse Corps and deputy chief, Wounded, Ill, and Injured, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, retired after 32 years of service during a change of office ceremony held at the Women in Service Memorial, Aug. 1.Rear Adm. Elizabeth Niemyer was relieved by Rear Adm. Rebecca McCormick-Boyle, chief of staff, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, and acting director, Navy Nurse Corps, during the ceremony.“Today we signify the celebration of a career and a Corps,” said Vice Adm. Matthew Nathan, U.S. Navy surgeon general and chief, U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, who was the officiating officer during the ceremony. “Admiral Niemyer, on behalf of all the Sailors whose lives youfve touched before and whose lives will be touched because of your efforts in the future, I thank you for what youfve done and the difference you have made. It has been a privilege and honor to serve with you.”During his remarks, Nathan also added the importance of care Navy nurses provide to their patients, which gives them hope, and adds to the Corpsf legacy.“If you are severely wounded, anywhere in the world, as you wake up and see a Navy nurse over you tending to your wounds, spirit and pain, all of a sudden you feel confidence and your hope is restored that you are going to make it through,” said Nathan. “That is the legacy that the first nurses in the Navy in the 1800s to the Sacred Twenty to the nurses today bring to the game and now you bring your leadership and vision as well as the strategic team that guides us.”During the ceremony, Niemyer, an Annapolis, Md. native, highlighted lessons learned throughout her career and several tours of duty around the globe.“Being the director of the Navy Nurse Corps was like a coming home for me,” said Niemyer. “I am delighted to turn the Nurse Corps over to Rear Adm. McCormick-Boyle. She is ready to take the mantle and lead the Nurse Corps of the future.”Niemyer was presented several letters of appreciation, during the ceremony, for her dedication and sacrifice over the past 32 years of service.“I have had a blessed career,” said Niemyer. “It is because of the outstanding officers, the enlisted and civilian staffs whom I have been privileged to work with. It is because of the love and support of my family that I have flourished. To all those who continue, I wish you fair winds and following seas.”In her distinguished career, Niemyer has held numerous clinical nursing and nursing leadership positions at National Naval Medical Center (NNMC), Bethesda, Md., Naval Medical Clinic Quantico, Va., and Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton, Calif., as well as risk manager at Naval Hospital Okinawa, Japan. As a senior executive, Niemyer held the position of director, managed care, NNMC; executive officer and commanding officer, Naval Hospital Rota, Spain; executive director, Tricare Area Office Europe, and deputy chief for operations, BUMED, among others.As the acting director of the Nurse Corps, McCormick-Boyle addressed the distinguished guests in her new position.“It is an honor and privilege to serve as the Navy Nurse Corpsfs acting director,” said McCormick-Boyle. “Admiral Niemyer, over the past three years, you have led us with grace, determination and purpose to care worldwide, anytime, anywhere. Navy Nurses have and continue to care with tremendous distinction and profound commitment on the battlefield, on ships, in operating rooms, clinics, labs, and classrooms, the list goes on. I am so grateful to be a Navy nurse and the privilege to follow in your footsteps and the path you have set forth.”Navy Medicine is a global health care network of more than 63,000 Navy medical personnel around the world who provide high quality health care to more than one million eligible beneficiaries. Navy Medicine personnel deploy with Sailors and Marines worldwide, providing critical mission support aboard ship, in the air, under the sea and on the battlefield.[mappress]Press Release, August 2, 2013 Share this article View post tag: Nurse Director of US Navy Nurse Corps Retired View post tag: US View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Navalcenter_img View post tag: Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today Director of US Navy Nurse Corps Retired View post tag: DIRECTOR View post tag: Retired View post tag: Corps Training & Educationlast_img read more

Hugh’s students complain about disciplinary measures

first_imgSt Hugh’s students have this week lodged complaints against a decanal system whose  procedures they have described as “active deaning.”Many have complained that the team of Junior Deans are trying to catch students out rather than help them, as one third year stated, “Their role is to protect the welfare of students, not to target them.”One second year told Cherwell that he had been falsely accused of physically threatening a junior dean. He received an email stating that he had “engaged in an altercation which concluded with [his] purposefully shoving a member of the decanal team” but claimed that he had merely left a gathering in a student’s room without a fuss.A biologist at St Hugh’s added, “Many people find the junior deans rude, sour and abrasive; I think that most students resent their presence around here. They treat us like children and they aren’t even welfare trained.”Anger has also been expressed over high fines. Mathematician Sam Johnston was fined £100 when junior deans had to return to his room to tell him to keep the volume down on a bop night.English student Tom Adams commented, “The fining system is thoroughly absurd, serving only to damage students’ (often already precarious) financial situations, without demonstrating any evidence of preventing further ‘offences’.” Adams has been fined almost £1,000 over his time as an undergraduate. He reflected, “Given that I’ve done nothing criminal nor anything to the ongoing detriment of the College or its members, this figure is absolutely shocking.”Adams added, “The problem as I see it is that the ‘Law’ is de facto on the College’s side, and the process by which decanal issues are handled flies in the face of anything that could conceivably be called ‘democratic’. The Dean is, so to speak, judge, jury and executioner, and he need only appeal to his own authority to dole out whatever rulings and punishments he sees fit. The Disciplinary Code which putatively underpins all this is purposefully obscure.”St Hugh’s Dean, Professor Peter Mitchell, responded, “I do not comment on anything that may or may not appear in the student press regarding the internal procedures of this college.”St Hugh’s students have this week lodged complaints against a decanal system whose  procedures they have described as “active deaning.”Many have complained that the team of Junior Deans are trying to catch students out rather than help them, as one third year stated, “Their role is to protect the welfare of students, not to target them.”One second year told Cherwell that he had been falsely accused of physically threatening a junior dean. He received an email stating that he had “engaged in an altercation which concluded with [his] purposefully shoving a member of the decanal team” but claimed that he had merely left a gathering in a student’s room without a fuss.A biologist at St Hugh’s added, “Many people find the junior deans rude, sour and abrasive; I think that most students resent their presence around here. They treat us like children and they aren’t even welfare trained.”Anger has also been expressed over high fines. Mathematician Sam Johnston was fined £100 when junior deans had to return to his room to tell him to keep the volume down on a bop night.English student Tom Adams commented, “The fining system is thoroughly absurd, serving only to damage students’ (often already precarious) financial situations, without demonstrating any evidence of preventing further ‘offences’.” Adams has been fined almost £1,000 over his time as an undergraduate.He reflected, “Given that I’ve done nothing criminal nor anything to the ongoing detriment of the College or its members, this figure is absolutely shocking.” Adams added, “The problem as I see it is that the ‘Law’ is de facto on the College’s side, and the process by which decanal issues are handled flies in the face of anything that could conceivably be called ‘democratic’. The Dean is, so to speak, judge, jury and executioner, and he need only appeal to his own authority to dole out whatever rulings and punishments he sees fit. The Disciplinary Code which putatively underpins all this is purposefully obscure.”St Hugh’s Dean, Professor Peter Mitchell, responded, “I do not comment on anything that may or may not appear in the student press regarding the internal procedures of this college.”last_img read more

Fisher’s Defense Of Pence Policies Cost Him 7th Circuit Bid

first_imgMarilyn Odendahl FOR WWW.THEINDIANALAWYER.COM Behind-the-scenes maneuvering by the Trump Administration to elevate Indiana Solicitor General Thomas Fisher to a seat on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals was apparently quashed by Vice President Mike Pence, according to a story published online Friday by Politico.According to the article, the White House counsel’s office, lead by then-attorney Don McGahn, wanted Judge Michael Kanne to retire so his seat could be filled by a younger conservative judge. In January 2018, conversations began with Kanne, now 80.The Indiana native told Politico that he told the White House he would consider taking senior status if Fisher — his former law clerk — was nominated as his replacement. However, Pence derailed the effort because, according to Politico, he did not want a public rehashing of the social-conservative controversies his administration was embroiled in during his time as Indiana governor.Contacted by Indiana Lawyer, Fisher declined to comment on the story and Kanne did not return a phone call.“I had not intended to take senior status because that wasn’t my plan, but if I had a former clerk who had the chance to do it, then I would,” Kanne said in an interview, Politico reported. “On the consideration that he would be named, I sent in my senior status indication to the president.” The article says Kanne withdrew his senior status request after the deal soured.Politico reported that according to five people familiar with the plans, “Pence’s aides got wind of the plan and scuttled Fisher’s nomination.” The report further said “neither McGahn nor his deputies had consulted with the vice president’s office before striking the tentative deal with Kanne, a breach of protocol that rankled Pence and his aides.”Fisher joined the Indiana Attorney General’s office in 2001 and became the state’s first solicitor general in 2005. A graduate of Wabash College and Indiana University Maurer School of Law, Fisher had the challenge of establishing the duties and responsibilities of solicitor general.“I didn’t want this to be a position that becomes in any way identified with me in the future,” Fisher said in a 2008 article for the Wabash College alumni magazine. “I just want this to be a solid stable position that has a well-defined role within the office. I’ll do the best I can to map that out and develop it even more.”As solicitor general, Fisher is often before Indiana and federal appellate courts defending the state’s laws or policies. He was often out front, defending the Pence administration’s most controversial policies and sometimes enduring withering attacks from the judges of the 7th Circuit.In 2014, Indiana appealed the overturning of its ban on same-sex marriage and Fisher unsuccessfully argued the state’s case at the 7th Circuit. Now-retired 7th Circuit Judge Richard Posner, in particular, was skeptical and kept pushing the solicitor general on how the ban was hurting the children in same-sex families.“What horrible stuff,” Posner said to Fisher during oral arguments in the case. What benefits to society in barring gay marriage, he asked, “outweighs that kind of damage to children?”Fisher tangled with Posner when the Pence Administration tried to ban Syrian refugees from being settled in Indiana.At one point, Posner quarried Fisher, “Are Syrians the only Muslims Indiana fears?” Fisher responded, “This has nothing to do with religion” which caused Posner to retort, “Oh, of course it does.” The two then engaged in a heated exchange for which Fisher was admonished for arguing over Posner.“Attempting to argue over a judge is not a productive method of argument,” Posner’s fellow panelist, Judge Frank Easterbrook, advised Fisher.The Religious Freedom Restoration Act that Pence singed in 2015 ignited a national firestorm when it was widely interpreted as allowing discrimination against members of the LGBTQ community. Legal scholars, including several professors from Indiana law schools, warned of the potential consequences of RFRA, and Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law had to cancel the annual Birch Bayh Lecture when the speaker declined to appear because of RFRA.Fisher was never called upon to defend the law. The Indiana General Assembly quickly adopted an amendment that was touted as fixing RFRA, but the legal community believed the courts would still have to grapple with issues raised by the law.Also, the fix apparently put Pence in hot water with religious conservatives.Pence was tapped to be vice president in the summer of 2016, but Fisher has continued to defend the former administration.As governor, Pence signed the House Enrolled Act 1337 in 2016, which limited access to abortion. The ACLU of Indiana and Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky filed two separate lawsuits challenging different provisions in the law.PPINK and the ACLU argued in the first lawsuit that HEA 1337 violated the Constitution by placing a prohibition against terminating a pregnancy because of the race, gender or genetic anomaly and by requiring that fetal remains be either buried or cremated. In the second complaint, the nonprofits asserted the law’s requirement that women seeking an abortion have an ultrasound at least 18 hours prior to the procedure created an undue burden.Fisher represented Indiana’s position when the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana blocked key provisions from being enacted. The 7th Circuit affirmed the district court’s rulings but in a per curiam decision, the Supreme Court of United States upheld the fetal disposition provision of HEA 1337.Fisher previously was among 15 applicants interviewed for a seat on the Indiana Supreme Court in 2016, but he was not among the three finalists the Indiana Judicial Nominating Commission presented to Pence for his appointment. Pence appointed Geoffrey Slaughter to the bench, replacing retired Justice Brent Dickson. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more