Odds & Ends: Lea Michele & Daveed Diggs Join Forces & More

first_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today.Lea Michele Cast in Daveed Diggs’ TV PilotLike Spring Awakening darling Lea Michele, Tony winner Daveed Diggs has taken his acting chops to the small screen following his lauded Broadway run in Hamilton. According to Deadline, the two are teaming up: Michele has been cast in Diggs’ previously reported ABC pilot. The single-camera comedy follows hip-hop artist Courtney Rose, to be played by Search Party star and Broad City alum Brandon Michael Hall. Rose runs for office as a publicity stunt to promote his mixtape and miraculously gets elected. No word yet on a pilot title, production timeline or Michele’s role, but we’re hoping she gets to use her musical talents! After all, Glee’s Rachel needs applause to live.Broadway Publicist & Former Performer Patty Freedman Dies at 64Patty Freedman, co-owner of Andrew E. Freedman Public Relations, has passed away at the age of 64. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Freedman died on February 17 after battling breast cancer. Her roster of clients included Stephen Schwartz, Jason Robert Brown, Liz Larsen, Eartha Kitt, Steven Lutvak, Margo Martindale, Winnie Holzman, John McDaniel, Julie Halston and Lea DeLaria. As an actress known as Patty Dworkin, her Broadway credits included See-Saw, Shenandoah and Sly Fox. On screen, she appeared in The Love Boat, Dynasty, Happy Days and Ghostbusters.Josh Gad & More Talk Beauty and the BeastDisney’s live-action remake of Beauty and the Beast hits theaters next month, and the teasers have our anticipation mounting. In a recently released featurette, the cast and director Bill Condon discussed the pressure and privilege of retelling the tale as old as time. “It was something that we all knew we had to live up to,” said Tony nominee Josh Gad, who plays Le Fou in the film. You can catch Broadway faves Gad, Kevin Kline, Ian McKellen, Stanley Tucci, Audra McDonald and the rest of the cast on March 17! View Comments Lea Michele (Photo: Jason Merritt/Getty Imageslast_img read more

Engineering insightful design

first_imgBruce Byrd, Nick Sopchak and Taylor Parrish solved a problem for a little girl with a disability. “She was born without fingers on her right hand, and she needed some help riding a bike,” Parrish said. “After meeting with her family we learned it is very difficult for her to ride up hills and to balance while riding.” The three University of Georgia sophomores turned the girl’s need into a project for their Design Methodology Systems Approach class, which charges students to find a need, develop a plan and analyze the impact.The team fabricated a plastic clip for her to wear on her hand, fastened with an arm brace. The clip fits into a mechanism on the handlebar of the bike. “We went through 22 different concepts,” Byrd said, before deciding on the hinged brace with the clip. “It is pretty rare to have a class project that is so satisfying, to see her face when we gave her the bike and to really make a difference in her life.” The course is co-taught by Tim Foutz and Sid Thompson, engineering professors with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Designed to develop critical thinking skills and economic feasibility, students learn to take a holistic view of solution development.“We want the students to figure out what is the market, who is the stakeholder, who will buy the product and what are the effects,” Foutz said. Teams in the class learn to create focus groups and conduct interviews to find needs. “We want them to judge their concept not based on their own opinions but rather use their engineering knowledge to develop a purposeful, profitable product,” Thompson said. Once they have an idea, the teams are given a budget and two vendors to purchase resources from. Other projects in the course this year included building a “dish wand” that connects to an ordinary kitchen sprayer to allow the person washing dishes to use just one hand and a device that measures and dispenses just the right amount of baby formula to help blurry-eyed parents with late-night feedings.“If I need to fix something in the future, I can think about what I learned in this class and figure out how to evaluate the situation and work smarter, not harder,” Paul Adeyemi, a student in the course. Two years ago, students in the class built demonstrations to teach school children about mechanical engineering. The year before that, students were handed a sheet of wood and told to build something useful. “We try to change it up,” Thompson said. “We don’t want it to be the same every year. That would be boring.”last_img read more

Invincible Soldiers of the Sea

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo December 18, 2017 The Chilean Marine Corps is an elite force of the Chilean Navy made up of 3,000 men. It’s a special force with unique strategic mobility to conduct amphibious operations on hostile ground. Its high level of training, high capability, and potential for rapid and discrete positioning, are among its main qualities.The corps will celebrate its bicentennial in June 2018. Diálogo interviewed Chilean Marine Corps Rear Admiral David Hardy Videla, commander of the Chilean Marine Corps and general commander of the Expeditionary Amphibious Brigade, during a visit to Viña del Mar, Chile, to discuss the corps’ mission, projects, and plans for 2018.Diálogo: What is the mission of the Chilean Marine Corps?Rear Admiral David Hardy Videla, commander of the Chilean Marine Corps and general commander of the Expeditionary Amphibious Brigade: The main mission of the Chilean Marine Corps is to help project Chile’s interests at sea, meaning defend Chilean shores, protect its waters, and primarily, help with everything related to the protection of shared interests in the region, within Latin America and particularly in South America.Diálogo: What is the most important project you are pushing forward?Rear Adm. Hardy: The main project concerns everything having to do with the area of interoperability. It’s important to be able to work with other navies, institutions, and security forces in the region. That’s why we’re working on an important project involving doctrinal development, common procedures, and, above all, training for the new types of threats emerging in the Latin American security environment.Diálogo: What kinds of security threats are you referring to?Rear Adm. Hardy: Our area is a quiet zone of peace, but we have to guard it to ensure that it remains that way. There are threats such as narcotrafficking, illicit trafficking, and human trafficking, but we also have nontraditional threats, such as those caused by nature. We have a lot of experience in everything related to supporting the community during earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, etc.Diálogo: How do you work on the concept of interoperability with your country’s other service branches?Rear Adm. Hardy: We have the Joint Chiefs of Staff (EMCO, in Spanish), which allows us to have a common doctrine and common procedures. Interoperability is a more complex topic. More than an interchangeable team that can communicate with each other, it’s having the same mindset, designing and working in institutional management. With EMCO, we work to achieve a common doctrine in the region. We work hard, and have friendships and ties with the U.S., Argentine, Brazilian, and Colombian militaries, which are our main partners.Diálogo: What kind of exchanges do you have with other countries?Rear Adm. Hardy: We have exchanges of officers and non-commissioned officers. Officers come from Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, and the United States to exchange experiences. We also send officers and non-commissioned officers to those countries. We have exercises, some of which are coordinated by U.S. Southern Command.Diálogo: What are the Chilean Navy’s net results for 2017?Rear Adm. Hardy: The year 2017 has been good for the Chilean Navy because we had several institutional changes, but mainly because we accomplished several development projects in technology, training, and resource investment. We started celebrating our bicentennial. The Chilean Navy, which the Marine Corps falls under, started celebrations for our 200th year as an institution, with several activities that will continue throughout 2018.Diálogo: In almost 200 years, what has been the Marine Corps’ key contribution to Chile?Rear Adm. Hardy: The Navy has had the very important job of guarding the seas, making the seas safe, and also connecting the southern zone from the Strait of Magellan to the desert in northern Chile along the coast. The Navy has been a conveyor of Chilean culture and lifestyle.Diálogo: What are the plans for 2018?Rear Adm. Hardy: Our bicentennial celebration. We’re also working on developing our personnel’s human capacities. The most complex part is training the youth who enter our institution. That’s why we look for new projects to educate our personnel so they become valuable citizens in today’s world, and can operate at home and abroad.Diálogo: You took command of the Marine Corps in late 2014. What has been your greatest source of satisfaction?Rear Adm. Hardy: Ours is a very tight-knit organization and we know each other. The more we know each other, the higher the trust—that makes us more efficient. It’s been an honor to serve with the Chilean marines. I’ve spent 37 years in this institution, which is an entire lifetime. I’m also very grateful to my superiors and especially to my subordinates, who’ve been loyal, hardworking, and committed to successfully lead this organization.Diálogo: How does the Marine Corps deal with gender issues?Rear Adm. Hardy: We’ve made a lot of progress in that area, as we now have institutional and national policies in the field of defense that allow women to participate in every professional activity within any institution. Of course, although it might seem strange, the only places without women are the submarine force and the Marine Corps.Diálogo: Why is that?Rear Adm. Hardy: There are two key reasons. There are many volunteers who want to go into the Marine Corps, but there hasn’t been much interest from women to enter this institution. It’s a very small organization, and women who join the Navy generally choose another field, such as being on a surface ship, in navy planes, etc. But I think that, in the future, we’ll have women in our marine corps.Diálogo: What is your message to the marine corps of the region?Rear Adm. Hardy: We have common interests, challenges, and threats that can’t be overcome unless we work together. Navies and marine corps generally look beyond their own countries. That’s why it’s essential that we know each other and share our concerns and experiences.last_img read more

June 1, 2006 Disciplinary Actions

first_imgJune 1, 2006 Disciplinary Actions Disciplinary Actions June 1, 2006 Disciplinary Actionscenter_img The Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders suspended 15, repremanded seven, and disbarred one attorneys.The following lawyers are disciplined: Margaret M. Anderson, 1707 20th St., Vero Beach, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a March 9 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1991) Among several Bar violations, Anderson engaged in conduct that was unlawful or contrary to honesty and justice; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that was prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC05-2135) Susan Lynn Eberle, 301 E. Pine St., Ste. 150, Orlando, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 30 days, effective 30 days following a March 16 court order. Upon reinstatement, Eberle is further placed on probation for two years. ( Admitted to practice: 1985) Eberle failed to explain a matter to the extent necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into her conduct. (Case no. SC05-1155) Raquel Lynn Floyd, P.O. Box 5183, Hialeah, suspended from practicing law in Florida for six months, effective 30 days following a March 16 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1998) Among several Bar violations, Floyd failed to provide a client with competent representation; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter. (Case no. SC05-1582) R. Matthew Gentile, 3155 Jackson Ave., Coconut Grove, suspended from practicing law in Florida on an emergency basis, effective 30 days following a March 1 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 2000) There is clear and convincing evidence that Gentile appears to be causing great public harm. (Case no. SC06-325) Thomas Gordon Hersem, 1421 Court St., Ste. B, Clearwater, suspended from practicing law in Florida for two years, effective 30 days following a March 16 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1977) Hersem engaged in misconduct and minor misconduct; violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct; and violated some of the Rules Regulating Trust Accounts. (Case no. SC05-1226) Justin I. Hirsch, 3032 Center St., Coconut Grove, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a March 16 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1979) Hirsch practiced law in a jurisdiction where doing so violated the regulation of the legal profession in that jurisdiction and knowingly made a false statement of material fact. (Case no. SC06-321) Larry Delton Houston, P.O. Box 208, Belleview, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 10 days, effective 30 days following a December 1, 2005, court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1983) Among several Bar violations, Houston failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and failed to promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case no. SC05-821) Mark Kevin Koenig, 400 Hibiscus St., Fl. 2, W. Palm Beach, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a March 16 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1986) Among several Bar violations, Koenig failed to provide competent representation to a client; violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct; and engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. (Case no. SC05-895) Richard Thomas Kozek, Jr., 7548 Bobcat Run, Port St. Lucie, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a March 16 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1991) Among several Bar violations, Kozek violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct; committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on his honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC05-1662) Kenneth T. Lange, 1125 NE 125th St., Ste. 301, N. Miami, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a March 16 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1978) Lange entered into an agreement for, charged, or collected an illegal, prohibited, or clearly excessive fee or cost and represented a private client in connection with a matter in which he participated personally and substantially as a public officer or employee. (Case no. SC06-380) Jerry Lee Lovelace, 215 SE 46th St., Cape Coral, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a March 9 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1994) Among several Bar violations, Lovelace failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC05-1158) Donald Frank Mintmire, 220 Sunrise Ave., Ste. 206, Palm Beach, suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a March 3 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1984) On or about Februaryruary 8, Mintmire was sentenced to 21 months imprisonment in a federal prison for his convictions of obstructing an official proceeding and conspiracy to obstruct justice, both felonies under federal law. (Case no. SC06-303) Barry Steven Mittelberg, 8100 N. University Dr., Ste. 102, Ft. Lauderdale, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 10 days, effective Februaryreary 17, following a January 26 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1984) Mittelberg violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct and engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. (Case no. SC05-548) Joseph Raymond Rowe, Jr., 1430 W. Busch Blvd., Ste. D, Tampa, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 30 days, effective 30 days following a March 9 court order. Upon reinstatement, Rowe is further placed on probation for two years. ( Admitted to practice: 1991) Among several Bar violations, Rowe failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information. (Case no. SC04-1781) Jeffrey Alan Schwarz, 16375 NE 18th Ave., Ste. 321, N. Miami Beach, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a March 9 court order. Schwarz is further placed on probation for one year. ( Admitted to practice: 1976) Schwarz failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC05-646) Allen Ross Smith, P.O. Box 1032, Winter Haven, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 90 days, effective 30 days following a March 16 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1974) Among several Bar violations, Smith failed to comply with the Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that was prejudicial to the administration of justice; and failed to make monthly reconciliations and comparisons. (Case no. SC05-1711) David M. Sostchin, 419 W. 49th St., Ste. 210, Hialeah, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a March 16 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1978) Sostchin engaged in misconduct and minor misconduct; violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct; and engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. (Case no. SC06-353) Linda Thompson, 915 W. Pennisular St., Tampa, suspended from practicing law in Florida for two years, effective 30 days following a March 16 court order. Upon reinstatement, Thompson is further placed on probation for three years. ( Admitted to practice: 1989) Thompson failed to act with diligence and promptness in representing a client; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into her conduct. (Case no. SC05-1580) Robert Joseph Tieso, 4331 N. Federal Hwy., Ste. 206, Ft. Lauderdale, suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a March 6 court order. Tieso shall remain suspended until he has complied with the court’s order to show cause, issued January 23, and has also certified full compliance with the subpoenas duces tecum served upon him by the 17th Judicial Circuit Grievance Committee “D” on November 22, 2005. ( Admitted to practice: 1988) Tieso failed to show cause on or before February. 7 why he should not be held in contempt of Court and suspended for the reasons set forth in The Florida Bar’s petition. (Case no. SC06-43) Derek Michael Tyler, P.O Box 821421, Pembroke Pines, suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a March 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1998) On or about November 4, 2004, Tyler was charged with one count of possession of controlled substance, a third degree felony. On or about November 21, 2005, Tyler entered a plea of nolo contendere, was adjudicated guilty, and sentenced. (Case no. SC06-427) James A. Walker, 7700 N. Kendall Dr., Ste. 404, Miami, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 30 days, effective March 8, following a March 9 court order. Upon reinstatement, Walker is further placed on probation for one year. ( Admitted to practice: 1980) Among several Bar violations, Walker failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case no. SC05-1324) James Patrick Woods, 1416 E. Concord St., Orlando, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following a March 30 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1996) Among several Bar violations, Woods failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; engaged in criminal misconduct; and failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case no. SC06-402) Stephanie Ann Yelenosky, 7512 Dr. Phillips Blvd., Ste. 50, Orlando, suspended from practicing law in Florida for two years, effective retroactive to July 11, 2005, following a March 9 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1994) Yelenosky entered into an agreement for, charged, or collected an illegal, prohibited, or clearly excessive fee or cost; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that was prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC05-1098) Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline.last_img read more

Hicksville Pedestrian Fatally Hit by Car

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 67-year-old woman was fatally hit by a vehicle in Hicksville on New Year’s Eve.Nassau County police said the woman was walking across Newbridge Road when she was hit by a southbound vehicle just north of Old Country Road at 10:48 p.m.The victim was taken to Nassau University Medical Center, where she was pronounced dead. Her identity was not immediately available.The driver was neither injured nor charged. Homicide Squad detectives impounded the vehicle for safety checks.last_img

Planning: need for new, sustainable communities

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Religion in conservative Mideast adapts to coronavirus

first_imgAuthorities in the Sunni-ruled Gulf Arab states of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman and Bahrain have halted prayers in mosques. In Egypt, the most populous Arab country, religious authorities have ordered a two-week closure of mosques and churches and banned mass communal prayers.The government in Tunisia — where some worshippers have been praying in front of shuttered mosque doors — said messages from imams will be broadcast to reinforce essential health protections. In Algeria, the azan, or call for prayer in mosques that the muezzin issues for the obligatory five daily Muslim prayers, has been modified. Muezzins are now encouraging worshippers to pray at home. In Iran, authorities have closed four key Shiite religious sites. The Islamic republic is one of the countries hardest hit by the virus with an official death toll of more than 1,600 and over 21,000 confirmed cases.The pandemic re-ignited a long-standing dispute between the roles of science and religion in Iran, but supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei intervened in support of medical professionals, effectively closing the debate. In Lebanon, the head of the Iran-backed Hezbollah movement Hassan Nasrallah urged people to abide by government measures. “The virus can be defeated if everyone takes responsibility and plays their part,” he said, calling on people to come forward if they develop COVID-19 symptoms. Some churches in Lebanon, a country home to 18 recognized religious sects including a large Christian community, have begun broadcasting the Sunday mass live on social media.Israel has banned gatherings of more than 10 people, making it impossible for Jews to form the quorum of ten needed for prayer known as a minyan.But chief rabbinical authorities have decreed that following health ministry guidelines is a religious duty and authorized prayer at home.   Resistance Even while top clerics have largely backed containment strategies, resistance has continued among the region’s deeply religious and conservative population. Iraq’s top Shiite cleric Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani has urged citizens not to gather in large numbers for prayers, where the risk of contamination could be high.But on Saturday tens of thousands turned out to commemorate a revered imam, Musa al-Kadhim, who died in 799 in the custody of Abbasid caliph Harun al-Rashid.That followed a call from influential cleric Moqtada Sadr for his followers to take part in the pilgrimage, defying government advice. The anniversary of the death normally attracts millions to the golden-domed mausoleum of Imam al-Kadhim in Baghdad.  Praying at home Leading Muslim clerics have widely backed scientifically based measures to contain the virus, notably by supporting crowd size restrictions through calling for home prayers.   In the Middle East, where the three main monotheistic faiths shape daily life, the coronavirus pandemic has seen religious leaders support constraints unthinkable just a few weeks ago. Top Islamic clerics in the region and in Muslim-majority North Africa have endorsed the closure of mosques to avoid large gatherings where the risk of contamination could be high.  The Latin patriarch of Jerusalem, custodian of Jerusalem’s Church of the Holy Sepulchre — believed by Christians to house Christ’s tomb — has told congregations to receive communion in their hand, instead of on their tongue. And Israel’s chief Sephardic rabbi, Yitzhak Yosef, issued a decree ordering followers to keep their mobile phones on through the Shabbat day of rest so they can receive urgent information about the COVID-19 disease. Extremism, superstition Extremist voices in the region have dismissed guidance from health officials and leading religious authorities. After Morocco closed mosques and announced a ban on all non-essential movements, outspoken Salafist preacher Abu Naim decried those moves as “apostasy”. He was arrested on terrorism charges.Groups of worshippers went out into the streets to pray in several Moroccan cities on Saturday night in defiance of the ban, local media reported. “God is the greatest, and only he can help us,” they chanted.There has also been a proliferation of faith-based responses to the pandemic with no supporting medical evidence. After the first case emerged last month in Lebanon, many Christians visited the tomb of St. Charbel, the country’s patron saint, and collected soil from the holy site, believing it would heal those infected.And last week, a Christian priest flew over Beirut in a helicopter to “bless” the country. Despite the decrees of top rabbis to follow medical guidelines, some Jewish leaders in Israel have offered alternative solutions to the pandemic. Ultra-Orthodox Rabbi Simcha Halevi Ashlag has encouraged people to drink the Mexican beer Corona, to fortify their prayers. “When we pray and drink an alcoholic drink, the prayers have more force,” he said in a video posted on social media earlier this month.  Topics :last_img read more

Vanguard continues Australian transition with European institutional appointment

first_imgAsset manager Vanguard has announced Robyn Laidlaw will become its head of institutional business in Europe, transitioning from the US firm’s Australian business.She becomes the second high-profile transfer from Australia to Europe after the appointment of John James as head of Vanguard’s European business management distribution and operation.James will move over from managing director and head of Vanguard Australia to lead the European business.Laidlaw, currently head of product and marketing in Australia, will report directly to James. She fills the European head of institutional role after the untimely passing of Simon Vanstone late last year, after two years with the firm.Laidlaw joined Vanguard Australia in 2006 as an institutional sales manager and moved on to several roles in product development and product manager for the firm’s exchange-traded funds business.Prior to this, she worked in client management roles for Russell Investments and ING Investment Management.Subject to approval from the UK financial services regulator, Laidlaw will assume responsibility for the institutional business in June 2015.last_img read more

People moves: NN IP hires behavioural scientist; New lead for XPS master trust

first_imgXPS Pensions Group – Paul Armitage has become the new head of the pension consultancy’s defined contribution (DC) master trust, National Pension Trust (NPT). He was formerly head of distribution at NPT and takes over from Dave Hodges, who retired earlier this year.NPT became an authorised master trust in 2019 and provides benefits for more than 46,000 members with assets under management worth more than £750m (€820m).Ben Bramhall, co-CEO at XPS, said: “I am delighted that Paul will lead NPT as this is a key area for XPS and the future of the pensions industry. We believe master trusts and NPT in particular will play a vital role in the future of pension provision, offering schemes and their members the well-governed, low-cost options that so many need.“I would also like to thank Dave Hodges for his enormous contribution to the business over many years and wish him the best in his retirement.”HSBC Global Asset Management – Lane Prenevost has been appointed as global head of discretionary asset management and head of UK multi-asset, reporting to Jean Charles Bertrand, global chief investment officer, multi-asset. Prenevost will start his new role on 1 September and will be based in London.With nearly 25 years in the industry, Prenevost brings a wealth of multi-asset experience, most recently as global head of wealth investments for HSBC Wealth and Personal Banking, where he led a global team of investment analysts and product experts focusing on wealth management and multi-asset investment solutions.Since joining HSBC Group in 2005, Prenevost also held senior investment roles at HSBC Global Asset Management, including global head of wealth and multi-asset product, where he led the design of products for both retail and institutional investors. Before that, he spent 12 years at TD Asset Management in Toronto, Canada, where he was a senior portfolio manager responsible for multi-asset solutions.In his new role, Prenevost will be responsible for the multi-asset team in the UK and will also focus on enhancing the firm’s global discretionary asset management proposition for clients across HSBC.Alongside this appointment, Ashley Reid, current head of the multi-asset team in London, will leave the firm to pursue other opportunities.Longview Partners – The specialist global equity investment firm has announced the appointment of Jamie Carter as chief operating officer. Formerly CEO of Oldfield Partners, a value equity investment management firm, Carter’s appointment is effective from January 2021. He will be a member of the London executive committee.With extensive investment management experience in a variety of roles spanning more than 20 years, Carter brings valuable experience to Longview’s executive team. He will have a broad multi-disciplinary remit.Carter was one of the founding partners of Oldfield Partners in 2005 and was appointed CEO in 2013. He played a key role in the development of the firm over the last 15 years. Prior to this, he was a product specialist at Merrill Lynch Investment Managers, where he started his career in 1998.Mercer  – David Scopelliti has been appointed global head of private debt at the consultancy, based in its US office in Connecticut. Mercer said he had more than 30 years of experience in a variety of senior private debt and private equity roles. He has been CEO of Alcentra Capital Corporation, partner at GarMark Partners, a middle market debt and equity firm, and head of private equity and principal investment officer at the State of Connecticut Retirement Plans and Trust Funds, among other roles.Mercer has nearly $4bn in assets under management in multi-manager private debt strategies.House of Lords –  Brinley Davies, Helena Morrissey and Frank Field have been nominated for life peerages.Davies would be the first qualified actuary to enter either House of Parliament for more than 50 years, said the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries (IFoA), of which he is a fellow. It said his peerage was in recognition of his expertise on pensions policy and for his services as a qualified actuary, where he has worked principally for the trade union movement to improve and maintain standards of public and occupational pension provision. Davies founded Union Pension Services in 1989 to support trade union pension schemes, after leaving Bacon and Woodrow, now part of Aon. He will sit on the Labour benches in the House of Lords.  Field chaired the influential Work and Pensions Select Committee from 2015 to 2019. Morrissey is head of personal investing at Legal & General Investment Management, which she joined in 2017. She also founded the 30% Club, which campaigns for more gender-balanced company boards, and is chairwoman of the Diversity Project. She chaired the UK asset management associaton from 2013 to 2017, and was chief executive of Newton Investment Management from 2001 to 2016.Phoenix Group – The FTSE 100 long-term savings and retirement business has named the leaders of five business units established to drive growth in its Open business, which manufactures and underwrites products primarily under the Standard Life brand.Tom Ground has been appointed managing director of the retirement services unit, responsible for driving growth in bulk purchase annuities and exploring the equity release market. He will join Phoenix in January from Aviva, where he is currently managing director of annuities and equity release. He has also previously held senior roles at L&G and Accenture.The leaders of the other Open business units have been promoted from within Phoenix Group. They will report into Andy Curran, CEO of Savings and Retirement, UK and Europe, when he takes over from Susan McInnes.Phoenix, which also has businesses in Germany and Ireland, broadly divides its business into two segments, Heritage and Open. The Heritage segment comprises products that are no longer actively marketed to customers and has been built through the consolidation of over 100 legacy insurance brands. The Open business is underpinned by a strategic partnership with Standard Life Aberdeen following Phoenix’s acquisition of Standard Life Assurance Limited in 2018.Artemis Investment Management – The asset management firm has announced that Greg Jones will join the firm on 1 September as its head of distribution, replacing Jasper Berens who has left Artemis. Until 2019, Jones was head of distribution for EMEA, APAC and Latin America at Janus Henderson.Jones joined Henderson in 2009 through its acquisition of New Star, where he was a founder of the company’s UK investment funds business and managing director of New Star International Investment Funds. He started his career in 1985 as a portfolio manager for part of Sedgwick Group, before moving into sales and management with Schroders, Morgan Grenfell and Aviva. He has 35 years of experience in fund management. NN Investment Partners, XPS Pensions Group, HSBC Global Asset Management, Longview Partners, Mercer, House of Lords, IFoA, Phoenix Group, ArtemisNN Investment Partners – Roeland Dietvorst has been appointed lead behavioural scientist at the Dutch asset manager. He will be part of the innovation team based in The Hague and report to Arnoud Diemers, head of responsible investing and innovation.According to NN IP, Dietvorst is a faculty member at Singularity University Benelux, and lectures on neuroscience at several business schools such as INSEAD and Universiteit van Amsterdam. He specialises in understanding cognitive bias, and the dynamics between automatic versus deliberate mental processes. He was founder of Alpha.One, a consumer neuroscience strategy firm.NN IP said he would apply his understanding of behavioural science and neuroscience and apply techniques to better understand how the processing of information leads to decision making in order to advance the investment decision-making process.last_img read more

Energean moves towards Karish & Tanin project FID with new gas sales contracts

first_imgGreek oil company Energean has signed further gas sales and purchase agreements (GSPAs) for natural gas supply from the Karish and Tanin fields, offshore Israel. Energean informed on Thursday that GSPAs totaling up to 2.6 billion cubic meters (BCM) of natural gas annually have been signed with one of the largest industrial groups in Israel, comprising Israel Chemicals, Bazan Oil Refineries and the independent power producer OPC.In addition, a GSPA totaling up to 0.3 BCM has also been signed with Rapac Group, a group focusing on Telecom, Government and Energy & Infrastructure in Israel.The new GSPAs, together with those already signed with Dalia Group, Dorad Group and Edeltech Group, bring the annual total committed purchase volume to more than 4 BCM per year of natural gas from the Karish and Tanin fields providing further momentum to progress to FID, targeted for early 2018.Energean Oil & Gas CEO, Mathios Rigas, commented: “In just one year since the Israeli Government granted its approval for the acquisition of the Karish and Tanin fields, Energean has succeeded in securing its targeted gas supply volume to help de-risk the project. Some of the leading private Israeli companies have seized the opportunity to buy gas at an attractive price and Energean has brought competition to the market for the benefit of Israeli consumers and the country’s economy.“These supply commitments, surpassing our initial 3 BCM per year target, demonstrate the strength of the local gas demand and we look forward to unlocking the significant further potential of these fields. We are aiming to progress with FID early in 2018 and our focus now lies in moving ahead on all related project milestones to deliver first gas as planned.”last_img read more