Go back to the enewsletter The cuisine of Italys

first_imgGo back to the enewsletterThe cuisine of Italy’s German- and Italian-speaking South Tyrol region, near the Austrian border, is nuanced and surprising. Hearty cold-weather dishes like polenta and canederli (dumplings) blend elements of German, Swiss and Austrian cooking, but also have plenty of Italian sophistication. Now ADLER Lodge ALPE, a cosy ski-in-ski-out resort on the country’s largest mountain plateau, is offering guests a chance to fully immerse themselves in the region’s food with the “Taste of South Tyrol” offer.The program includes:A tour and tasting at the Tramin winery, which is known for its GewürztraminerCheese and beer tastings to showcase locally produced specialtiesA visit with honey producer Runggaldier WernerA trip to David’s Goaslhof, a goat and dairy farmA baking lesson with ADLER Lodge ALPE pastry chef, Elisa KostnerActivities such as hiking, yoga, mountain biking and educational botanical walks (with a focus on medicinal herbs)It’s priced at €637 per person per night, based on a three- to seven-night stay.Overseeing the kitchen at ADLER Lodge ALPE is Chef Hannes Pignater, who has won a series of international awards including the Gold Medal at the World Skills Competition in St. Gallen, Switzerland and the Silver Medal at the Culinary Olympics in Erfurt, Germany. His style is simultaneously creative and authentic, with a focus on quality produce from South Tyrol that is sourced directly from committed farmers.The pastry chef, Elisa Kostner, also has an unusual approach to creating her mouthwatering desserts, which are rooted in the traditions of the Dolomite area but also have her own distinctive touches. “I don’t think about what I want to serve, be it mousse, ice cream or a cupcake, but rather what ingredients I want to use. These could be buckwheat, dandelion, quark, chamomile or honey pollen,” she says. The chefs’ use of local ingredients not only supports the Dolomites’ farmers, but also reduces the travel distances for delivery trucks and, as a result, carbon emissions. The hotel also serves only their own mountain spring water (either flat or sparkling), to avoid the shipping and excess waste associated with plastic water bottles.Open for all seasons, the hotel consists of a main building with 18 junior suites as well as 12 private, freestanding chalets, modelled after classic mountain huts, dotted throughout the property.The ADLER Lodge ALPE is set in its own loft within the main building; it’s home to a hay sauna, fitness centre and windows offering panoramic views of the rolling meadows and jagged Dolomite peaks.For more information: https://www.adler-resorts.com/en/Go back to the enewsletterlast_img